Archive | October, 2016

Inspire the next generation through vocational service

7 Oct

Service in Action

By Daniel Seddiqui, Founder of Living the Map

I first became acquainted with Rotary International while living in Evanston to coach the Women’s Cross Country team at Northwestern University.  In 2008, I embarked on an ambitious journey to work 50 Jobs in 50 States in 50 weeks. Throughout my venture, I’ve had the great privilege of speaking at Rotary clubs across the country about my Living the Map program. Now, after settling in Denver, I plan to finally become a Rotary member.

Living the Map offers a national education program to redefine the traditional college internship.  We provide a college credited opportunity for students to experience a rapid prototyping of work and culture related to their career and geographic interests. We aim to empower college students to make informed decisions about their future career paths and gain cultural awareness by exposing them to a variety of authentic work experiences…

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Miles to End Polio: combining a passion for cycling, service

6 Oct

Rotary Voices

Robson Duarte and bike in front of the São Paulo Cathedral. Robson Duarte and bike in front of the São Paulo Cathedral.

161003_duarte_headBy Robson Duarte, Rotary staff

For the past two years, I have been a part of a volunteer group called “Atitude Certa.” Our mission is to visit orphanages and help with whatever we can, bringing joy and comfort to children even if it’s only on weekends. This is very gratifying, because we can see the joy stamped on the face of every child.

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Reducing poverty through economic and community development

5 Oct

By Azka Asif, Rotary Service and Engagement Staff Globally, 836 million people still live in extreme poverty today. About one in five persons in developing regions lives on less than $1.25 USD per …

Source: Reducing poverty through economic and community development

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Reducing poverty through economic and community development

5 Oct

Service in Action

By Azka Asif, Rotary Service and Engagement Staff

Globally, 836 million people still live in extreme poverty today. About one in five persons in developing regions lives on less than $1.25 USD per day. Global unemployment has increased from 170 million in 2007 to nearly 202 million in 2012, of which about 75 million are young women and men.*

How can we change that?

By supporting projects that focus on generating income and creating productive employment opportunities, we can reduce poverty. Providing income security and empowering women, people with disabilities, youth, and the extremely poor is essential to economic and community development.

Rotarians worldwide are committed to reducing poverty through projects that provide people with equipment, vocational trainings, and work to strengthen local entrepreneurs and community leaders, particularly women, in impoverished communities. Below are a few examples of Rotarians taking action.

Growing local economies

The Constantia Rotary Club helped set…

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Creating stronger Basic Education and Literacy projects

4 Oct

By Mary Jo Jean-Francois, Area of Focus Manager for Basic Education and Literacy Each and every day, I am amazed at the work Rotary clubs and districts do in education. From simple book drives to c…

Source: Creating stronger Basic Education and Literacy projects

Creating stronger Basic Education and Literacy projects

4 Oct

Service in Action

By Mary Jo Jean-Francois, Area of Focus Manager for Basic Education and Literacy

Each and every day, I am amazed at the work Rotary clubs and districts do in education. From simple book drives to complex reading assessments in classrooms, hundreds—possibly thousands—of Rotary projects are being done each year to help better education for children and adults throughout the world.

As 1.2 million Rotarians, we know we have the ability to significantly impact the lives of children and adults by bringing opportunities to access education. But this alone may not be enough. The education learners receive must also be of high quality. This is done by ensuring teachers are properly trained and have access to additional training opportunities. It is accomplished through working with school directors, teachers, students and parents to understand the challenges their schools face and how we can help them achieve their goals beyond providing equipment. And…

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New Englanders, Nigeria clubs aid Boko Haram refugees

3 Oct

Rotary Voices

By Marty Peak Helman, District 7780 Foundation Chair

Children in a refugee camp in eastern Nigeria. Children in a refugee camp in eastern Nigeria.

The American University of Nigeria (AUN) was co-founded by Rotarian Felix Obadan in 2000, and 12 years later, when Felix was governor of Rotary’s District 9125, which covers a large portion of Nigeria, he chartered the Rotary Club of Yola-AUN on campus. Their strong influence on campus makes it not surprising that many University professors and senior staff are Rotary members, and that the University prides itself on its work toward peace, entrepreneurship, and economic development as well as its strong academics.

The University’s mission is to graduate students prepared to take on the challenges in Nigeria and throughout West Africa – challenges of climate change, development, and peace building. And peace is not an abstract concept at the university. After all, it is located in Yola, the capital of Adamawa State, in the region where…

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