Archive | January, 2018

Rediscovering traditional justice in Africa

31 Jan

Rotary Voices

George Chacha

By George Chacha, 2013 Rotary Peace Fellow at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Before Europeans colonized much of Africa, local villagers had their own way of resolving conflicts through traditional justice systems. The community would select a certain number of elders, who they felt most suitable for deciding cases, to handle disputes. A distinctive characteristic of these traditional justice systems is that they primarily sought to heal relations between victims and offenders, in contrast to English Common Law, which by and large seeks to punish offenders as a deterrent to further offenses.

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Celebrating success with the Rotaract Outstanding Project Awards

30 Jan

via Celebrating success with the Rotaract Outstanding Project Awards

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Celebrating success with the Rotaract Outstanding Project Awards

30 Jan

Service in Action

By Erika Emerick, Rotary Programs for Young Leaders Staff

Every year, Rotaract clubs around the world develop innovative solutions to community challenges. Rotary International recognizes these high-impact, sustainable projects with the Rotaract Outstanding Project Award.

Through 1 February 2018, Rotarians and Rotaractors are invited to nominate their best Rotaract project from the past year for an award. One club and multi-club group receiving top honors will each be awarded US$1000.

Last year, over 300 projects were nominated across 52 countries. Get inspired for your award nomination by learning more about outstanding projects from 2016-17.

Single-club and multidistrict winners:   

  • Single club: The Rotaract Club of the University of Moratuwa in Sri Lanka launched a three-year project to improve lives in the rural community of Ranugalla. During the first year, the club opened a library and science lab for the local school and helped prepare students for college entrance…

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People of Action campaign rocks San Diego airport

27 Jan

Rotary Voices

Short People of Action videos greeted travelers at the San Diego International Airport 10-24 January.

By Scott Carr, 2017-18 governor of District 5340

We enjoy serving as the host district for Rotary’s annual training event of incoming district governors here in San Diego, California, and are honored to provide volunteers to help with transportation, serve as hospitality night hosts, and greet arriving leaders at the airport. It is an important role. When you’ve been flying in a cramped airplane for 20 hours or more, there is no better sight than a smiling Rotarian to greet you and help you get to your destination.

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Adding vocational service to our project

26 Jan

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Adding vocational service to our project

26 Jan

Service in Action

By Jerry Kallman, Past President of the Rotary Club of Ridgewood, New Jersey, USA

Rotary’s guiding principles were developed to provide Rotarians with a unifying common purpose and direction. The Avenues of Service have always served as a foundation for our relationships with other members and the type of action we take in the world.

For the past nine years, the Rotary Club of Ridgewood has been supporting students of Kishermoruak Primary School in the Maasai Mara Reserve in southern Kenya. I came across the school during my quest for international service; since 2008,  we’ve invested in the school, its students, teachers and the community through various joint projects.

To truly embody the Avenues of Service, I wanted to incorporate vocational service and grow our projects by empowering others through training and skill development.

Empowering women

In partnership with the British non-profit organization Bees Abroad, we started offering bee-keeping…

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How Rotary became the heart, soul of polio eradication

25 Jan

Rotary Voices

Ken Solow

By Ken Solow, past governor of District 7620

Have you ever wondered how Rotary became involved with polio eradication in the first place? I did. I used to use polio eradication as an example of poor goal setting in my presidents-elect training seminar classes. It was up there right next to world peace. I mean … really?

It turns out that one of the true giants in our story was a past governor in my district (7620). His name is Dr. John Sever. While you’ve probably never heard of him, I think when you learn his story you will be amazed. You will also learn about many other Rotary leaders who have been a part of the incredible story of how Rotary got started on our journey to eradicate polio. 

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